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I first saw a photograph of this iconic engraved panel scene Colt Second Dragoon percussion revolver whilst visiting a friend of mine in Sweden more than Twenty years ago. I expressed my interest in buying the revolver but was told that is was owned by a collector friend of his and that it was not for sale at that time. My friend contacted me in February 2003 to say that the collector was contemplating selling the gun and asked me if I was still interested in buying it. By May of 2003 and after two visits to Stockholm, I had completed the purchase and had the gun in my possession. The collector told me that he had bought the revolver in London after the Second World War in 1947.. It had remained in his collection for more than fifty years. This magnificent revolver was a true ‘sleeper’. I couldn’t wait to search the archives, to identify the panel scene portrait and uncover the story behind this elaborately engraved revolver.

The Colt Second Model is the rarest of the Colt Dragoons, with only approximately 2,700 manufactured circa 1850 and 1851, from around serial number 8000 to 10700. Only a few examples are known to have been specially engraved by the Hartford Factory (2). Out of these, only three are known by me to have been commissioned by Samuel Colt to be engraved with added rarity of a panel scene. Two are consecutively numbered 10222 (Third Model) and 10223 (Second Model),  and 10333, which is also a Second Model, and is well-known to collectors and documented on several specialised gun books.

commissioned by Samuel Colt to be engraved with added rarity of a panel scene. Two are consecutively numbered 10222 (Third Model) and 10223 (Second Model),  and 10333, which is also a Second Model, and is well-known to collectors and documented on several specialised gun books.

Exhibition grade engraved Colt Second Model Dragoon .44 percussion six shot revolver serial number revolver #10223, was manufactured circa 1851, with the rare panel scene of the Marquis De Lafayette.

When I acquired the gun I did not know the name of the gentleman in the panel scene. It was only on a visit to the Connecticut State Library, Hartford in October 2003 that the Museum Administrator, Dean Nelson conclusively identified Layfayette’s portrait in the panel scene. This discovery far exceeded my expectations and led to further research to reach the following conclusions.   

The revolver is heavily embellished in the distinctive early factory donut or cloud style of large scroll engraving with stylistic borders to the barrel, loading lever, frame, hammer, back-strap, trigger-guard, wedge and screws. The frame is profusely scroll engraved with ‘COLTS / PATENT’ hand engraved within two of the scrolls on the left side of the revolver.

Rare panel scene of Marquis De Lafayette
Rare panel with George Washington

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The rear of the recoil shield is heavily engraved with a clam shell design within scrolls on the left side and scrolls on the right. Both sides of the recoil have an exhibition type double border with diagonal markings.

The serial number (with no dot after the number on the bottom) on the frame is underlined with a floral pattern and bordered by fine lines within a rectangle. The hammer has the serpent design with wings, scrolling and scales on the top of the hammer spur.

The seven and a half inch part round and part octagonal barrel with a German silver blade front sight has two coronets engraved amongst the many scrolls on the left side. The rare panel portrait of the Marquis de Lafayette (3) is engraved within an oval on the right side of the barrel lug surrounded by scrolls. The two side flats of the barrel are engraved with scrolls within a hatched background and an exhibition style border at the breech end. The address on the top flat has an undulating border running parallel with ‘ADDRESS SAML COLT. NEW-YORK CITY’ with a stop after Colt with three leaf motifs pointing into the valleys.

The serial number on the barrel is surrounded by fine straight lines on three sides with a flowing scroll and sunset effect above the number.

The muzzle end of the barrel has a special double border with V shaped motifs running around the barrel.

The loading lever with the plunger screw entering from the right side is scroll engraved within a bold roped border on both sides of the flats around the barrel screw. The vertical catch that attaches the loading lever to the barrel at the muzzle end is finely cross- hatched or knurled within a rectangular border.

The cylinder has rectangular stops and is roll engraved with the Ranger and Indian scene with MODEL U.S.M.R. and COLT’S PATENT, forming a cartouche with the serial number 10223 stamped within.

The silver plated brass back strap is heavily engraved on the shoulders with fine flowing scrolls from top to bottom with a quartered shield positioned in the centre. The top right and bottom quadrants left are engraved with six horizontal lines.

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The base of the back-strap is scroll engraved within a rectangular border with a circular border around the butt screw head and a line along the top and bottom of the serial number.

The silver-plated square-back trigger-guard is engraved on the base of the guard with scrolls and with two engraved borders running parallel the full length of the side flats. The serial number is bordered within an oval encompassed with scrolls.

‘Charles. Nephew & Co. Calcutta’ (1) is finely inscribed in script lettering running from behind the triggerguard and down towards the toe of the butt.

All the screw heads, except the butt screw, are engraved both ends with rosette motifs with eight petals engraved at the entry end. The wedge which is numbered 223, is also engraved at both ends with two curled scrolls and cross hatching within a rectangular border on the left side where it enters the barrel. It has scrolling to the other end where it protrudes on the right side of the barrel.

The grip strap is elongated with the toe of the grip facing slightly down as opposed to being level as found on most Colt Dragoons. This magnificent engraved hefty revolver is complimented with rare one-piece rosewood grips and weighs four pounds and two ounces.

The revolver is in very good condition with very faint traces of original finish in protected areas. The grip straps retain 80% original silver plating. Engraving and markings are sharp with clear lettering and numerals. The cylinder retains approximately 60% of its Indian and Ranger scene. All numbers are matching including the wedge. The butt screw has probably been replaced. The bore is bright showing the barrel’s progressive rifling and the action is tight. The later flat style mainspring retains all its deep fire blue finish. All six safety pins on the rear of the cylinder are intact. The revolver internally is in excellent condition and shows very little use. The one piece rosewood grips which appear to be oiled and not varnished are in excellent condition with no chips or cracks.

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The embellishments on Colt Second Model Dragoon #10223 are thought to be by the hand of the master of bank note engraving and personal friend of Samuel Colt, Waterman Lilly Ormsby (4). The portrait of Lafayette (5) on #10223 appears to be the head and shoulders of the full length engraved image of him which is featured in plate numbered 24 from W.L. Ormsby’s book (6) on bank note engraving and counterfeiting.

That full-length image of Lafayette was taken from a well-known painting by the French artist Ary Scheffer (1795-1858). He created this masterpiece (6) in 1822. The life-size portrait painting which hangs in the House of Representatives in Washington was a gift to the nation from a grateful Lafayette on his return to America in 1824. A smaller version hangs in the Fogg Art Museum in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

On all accounts, engravings of the portrait of Lafayette (7) were cherished by his admirers on both sides of the Atlantic. His images can be found on numerous objects such as on bank notes, ceramics, glassware, ribbons, stamps, playing cards, medals and commemorative objects.

There are also many items portraying the head and shoulders portrait of both George Washington and Lafayette (8) side by side on the same item.

The connection between Washington and Lafayette is what makes # 10223 a very interesting and important subject of investigation.

The above mentioned Colt Second Model Dragoon has a ‘non identical twin’ in the form of the earliest known Colt Third Model Dragoon # 10222 which is consecutively numbered to # 10223. It is also similarly engraved with a panel scene portrait of George Washington on the left side of the barrel lug. This gun is presently on display at the Autry Museum of Western Heritage in Los Angeles, California (9).

Herbert G. Houze the noted author and historian informed me that Larry Sheerin (10) first saw #10222 at a gun show in Jacksonville or Vero Beach, Florida in the late 1940’s. After corresponding with the owner for about a year, he purchased the piece for $900 (an amount he described as being as “big as a wagon wheel” at the time). He said that Larry was fascinated by the Washington portrait even though “it wasn’t a Benjamin West”. He thinks that the gentleman may have originally bought it in England during the war. He couldn’t recall the owners name, but if it came to mind he would let me know.

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The connection between George Washington and the Marquis de Lafayette goes back to the American Revolution. Lafayette was a wealthy French aristocrat and courtier at the court of King Louis XVI who fought alongside the American colonists against the British. He fought with distinction at the Battle of Brandywine, Pennsylvania in 1777 where he was wounded and conducted a masterly retreat from Barren Hill in 1778. He joined Washington’s staff and became a staunch friend of George Washington who developed a fatherly affection towards him. Lafayette brought a 6,000 man expeditionary army from France and was given the command of an army in Virginia where in 1781, he forced the British commander Lord Charles Cornwallis, who commanded a much larger army, to retreat across Virginia entrapping him at Yorktown and ultimate surrender. After this defeat the British cause was lost. On his return to France in 1782 Lafayette had become a “Hero to two worlds”. At the tender age of only twenty four he assisted in the negotiations that won America independence from Great Britain.

On a plaque on a monument of La Fayetteville that stands outside the Connecticut State Library, Hartford, Connecticut states: “To the Marquis de La Fayette… A true friend of liberty, who served as a Major General in the Continental army with ‘All possible zeal, without any special pay or allowances’ until the American colonists secured their freedom. And whose frequent visits to this State, as aide to Washington, as liaison officer with supporting French troops, and in the pursuit of freedom, are gratefully remembered”.

Taking all the above information into consideration it is my theory that Colt Second Model Dragoon #10223 and Colt Third Model Dragoon #10222 were engraved especially for exhibition purposes as per Samuel Colt’s letter (11) that he wrote to his brother Elisha on 18th July 1849. My feelings are that they were exhibited side by side at the Great Exhibition of the Works of Industry of all Nations held at the Crystal Palace in Hyde Park, London from 1st May to 15th October 1851. It is my submission that these two revolvers were the figurehead display of the exhibition of ‘large size pistols’ by nature of their quality, the intensity of the engraving and the rarity of the panel scenes.

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Samuel Colt’s greatest opportunity to expand his empire world-wide was to display more than five hundred pistols at the Great Exhibition of 1851 at Crystal Palace, London. This awesome display of engraved and deluxe arms alongside his standard production of firearms was to presage the opening of his London factory which would produce thousands of firearms to sell throughout the British Empire and beyond. London was to be his gateway to Europe and the rest of the world.

Colt’s dazzling panoply of firearms exhibited at the Crystal Palace in London (12) in my opinion would show Colt Second Model Dragoon #10223 with square-back trigger-guard, rosewood grips and Lafayette panel scene (on the right side of the gun) on the left facing towards the newly designed Colt Third Model Dragoon #10222 with rounded trigger-guard, burl walnut grips and George Washington panel scene (on the left side of the gun) on the right. In this position both panel scenes would be visible at the same time. Maybe the above-mentioned revolvers are the top two pistols featured on the left side wall display (12) with one facing to the right and the other one facing to the left.

It may have been Samuel Colt’s sense of humour that made him decide to have a portrait of Washington and Lafayette (who were instrumental in humiliating the British army in the War of Independence) engraved and displayed on two of his magnificent ‘large size pistols’ at the Great Exhibition of 1851 in London whilst the echoes of the American Revolution were still ringing within living memory of many people in Great Britain.

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Comparisons between #10222 and #10223

Colt Second Model Dragoon # 10223:

a) Square-back trigger-guard with rectangular cylinder slots makes it a Second Model.
b) Panel scene of the Marquis de Lafayette engraved on right side of barrel.
c) Inscribed behind trigger-guard: ‘Charles Nephew & Co. Calcutta’.
d) No British proof marks.
e) Provenance: Bought in London by a Swedish collector from Stockholm after the war circa 1947. I bought it from a friend of the collector in Stockholm in May 2003. The revolver was a sleeper having been out of circulation for more than fifty years.
f) Rosewood grips.
g) Complimentary style of engraving to #10222.

Colt Third Model Dragoon # 10222:

a) Rounded trigger-guard with rectangular cylinder slots makes it the lowest numbered Third Model Dragoon known. eventhough it falls in the Second Model range. The start number for the Third Model Dragoon according to R.L. Wilson is around #10700.
b) Panel scene of George Washington engraved on the left side of the barrel.

b) Panel scene of George Washington engraved on the left side of the barrel.

c) No inscription.d) No British proof marks. e) Provenance: Bought in London by a Florida collector during the Second World War. Larry Sheerin bought it from him in 1947 for $900.f) Burl walnut grips.g) Complimentary style of engraving to #10223.To show that #10222 and #10223 were exhibited at the Great Exhibition of the Works of Industry of all Nations held at the Crystal Palace in Hyde Park, London which took place from 1st May to 15th October 1851 I have had to establish when both revolvers were manufactured.

According to ‘Colt’s dates of Manufacture 1837-1978’ by R.L.Wilson production of Colt Dragoons were as follows:

Colt Second Model Dragoon

a) 1850 Serial number 8000 to 9499 1499 produced.
b) 1851 Serial number 9500 to 10699 1199 produced.
Total 2698 produced.

Colt Third Model Dragoon

c) 1851 Serial number 10700 to 11999  – 1300 produced.

The Lafayette Bank five dollars banknote showing Washington on the left and Lafayette on the right
barrels

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According to the above figures 2499 Dragoons (b + c) were manufactured in 1851. Therefore on a pro-rata basis 48 were produced per week. On that basis serial numbers 10222 and 10223 were both manufactured by the middle of April 1851. The committee to organise and administer the Exhibition under the Presidency of Prince Albert was set up well before 1851 giving Samuel Colt plenty of time for preparation. Allowing for a pre-Exhibition rush by the factory and three weeks shipping to England there is every chance that both

revolvers would have been on display by the first of May 1851.

With the panel scenes on #10222 & #10223 on different sides of the barrel it suggests that both guns were engraved especially for exhibition purposes so that they could be displayed facing each other showing both panel scenes at the same time. It also suggests to me that these two revolvers may have been one of the figureheads of the exhibition by nature of the quality, intensity of the engraving and the rarity of the panel scenes.

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By displaying #10222 and #10223 together as above, apart from both panel scenes being visible it would also show the standard Second Model with square-back trigger-guard on #10223 on the left facing the new design Third Model with the rounded triggerguard on
# 10222 on the right along with contrasting grips of rosewood on # 10223 and select burl walnut on # 10222.

It is doubtful that both revolvers were originally cased in a traditional double casing for presentation to an individual as only one panel scene would be visible at any time and also other differences such as the trigger-guard and the shape of grip-straps would make it very difficult to make the set look symmetrical.

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The two revolvers facing each other at the top of the display are possibly the "Lafayette" and "Washington" Dragoon revolvers

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Panel scene of George Wshington on the left side of serial number 10222. Photograph courtesy of the Austry Museum of Westewrn Heritage in Los Angeles, California

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Image of Lafayette taken from a well-known painting by the French Artist Ary Scheffer (1795-1858) who painted him in 1822

It is doubtful that both revolvers were originally cased in a traditional double casing for presentation to an individual as only one panel scene would be visible at any time and also other differences such as the trigger-guard and the shape of grip-straps would make it very difficult to make the set look symmetrical.

Inscription: ‘Charles, Nephew & Co. Calcutta’.

After the Great Exhibition closed on 15th October, 1851 most of the display guns were either presented to prominent persons and institutions or to serving British officers that were leaving for the far outposts of the British Empire in South Africa, India or Australia. I have evidence to suggest that Charles and Park Pittar (his nephew, hence the name) who were the principals of Charles, Nephew & Co., Calcutta were good friends and business colleagues of Samuel Colt and probably also exhibited their company’s products at the Great Exhibition. As retailers the company were acknowledged for their creative design and superb finish as one of the most prominent jewelers, 

watchmakers, gold and silversmiths in the world. From 1848 to 1870 they had business offices in Calcutta and at Simla in India and also at 10 John Street, Adelphi in London. They are also known to have retailed firearms during this period.

Serial number 10223, along with Colt Second Model Dragoon # 10333 engraved with a panel scene of a Dragoon soldier hunting buffalo were both inscribed ‘Charles, Nephew & Co., Calcutta’. Probably both revolvers along with other engraved and non-engraved examples went to India together sometime after the Exhibition ended. Maybe the two inscribed Dragoon revolvers in question remained in London. The friendship and business relationship between the Pittar’s and Colt continued for at least two years after the Exhibition when Sam presented Park Pittar with a cased engraved Colt Model 1851 London Navy Square-back revolver serial number 207 inscribed “Presented / to / Park Pittar EsqR / by / ColL Colt”. I had the privilege of having this beautifully engraved revolver in my collection for many years.

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Known engraved Colt Second and early Third Model Dragoons circa 1850 & 1851.

8478 Cased and engraved with burl walnut grips. Locke Collection page 51.
8487 Cased and engraved. Little John’s auction in May, 2012.
9343. Engraved and inscribed ‘Col John Hays’. The inscription is questionable.
9516. Engraved with ivory grips.
9616. Cased and engraved with ivory grips.

9623 Double cased, profusely engraved Second Model along with engraved Colt Model
1851 Second Model Squareback s/n 843. Presented to HRH Prince Albert.
9625 Engraved similar to Albert’s revolver. Tower of London.
9646. Engraved.
9923 Partially engraved to loading lever, hammer and screws.
10222 Engraved with panel scene of George Washington (Autry Museum of Western
Heritage). First Third Model with rounded trigger-guard. Earliest known Colt Third
Model Dragoon. Recognised range of third models start at #10700.

10223  Engraved with panel scene of Lafayette.

Plate from W.L. Ormsby's book on banknote engraving and counterfeiting
p13

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10223_stamp

10333 Engraved with panel scene of Dragoon on horseback shooting a buffalo ( pictured
in ‘The Colt Engraving Book’ . Volume I by R.L. Wilson, page 45. Inscribed
‘Charles Nephew & Co. Calcutta’ on the back-strap. John Woodard (now deceased),
told me many years ago that #10333 was originally found in India. With the ‘Charles
Nephew’ inscription this fits in with pattern of movement of guns following the end of
the Great Exhibition of 1851.
10338 Engraved.
10477 Engraved Third Model with rounded trigger-guard with ivory grips.
10478 Engraved Third Model with rounded trigge-rguard.
10535 Engraved and inscribed ‘Asa Law’.
10597 Engraved with ivory grips.
10742 Highest known engraved Second Model Dragoon.

The above serial numbers were given to me by Philip Boulton of Southampton, England from his extensive research on the serial numbers of all Colt percussion revolvers. His database lists 12.308 % of the production of Colt Second Model Dragoons as of February 2004.

Engraved Colt Second Model Dragoon serial number 9343 according to the description by Christie’s East, New York has a later inscription on the back-strap of: ‘Presented to Col. John C. Hays Compliments of Sam. Colt, Nov.24, 1849’ and ‘Defender of Texas’. If this gun was manufactured by November 1849 it would confirm that the production of Colt Second Model Dragoons commenced earlier than 1850 and that Colt would easily have reached #10233 several months before the start of the Great Exhibition of 1851

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Having researched the following revolvers for several years I have concluded that in my opinion both Colt Second Model Dragoon #10223 and Colt Third Model Dragoon #10222 were especially engraved by W.L. Ormsby himself for display purposes on Samuel Colt’s stand at the Great Exhibition of 1851 in London. These two revolvers were the figurehead of the exhibition of his ‘large size pistols’ by nature of the quality, intensity of the engraving and the rarity of the panel scenes. My reasoning is based on the following evidence and reasoning:

A) The revolvers are consecutively numbered 10222 and 10223.

B) Colt #10223 is a Second Model and #10222 a Third Model Dragoon.

C) Colt #10223 has one piece rosewood grips and #10222 has one-piece burl walnut one-
piece burl walnut grips.

D) Both revolvers have Exhibition style engraving.

E) Both revolvers have ultra rare panel scene portraits.

F) The panel scene on #10222 is of George Washington and the panel scene on #10223 is of
The Marquis de Lafayette.

G) Washington and Lafayette were friends and allies who were instrumental in defeating the British in the American War of Independence. They were often found pictured together on such things as bank notes and commemorative items.

H) The panel scene on #10222 is on the left side of the barrel and the panel scene on #10223 is on the right side of the barrel. These revolvers were engraved for display purposes so the both panel scenes were visible when facing each other on a wall or table top display. If they had been cased in a traditional double case only one panel scene would have been visible at any one time. Both revolvers have different characteristics: Square-back and round trigger-guard, shape of grip-straps and different material to the one-piece wood grips being oil finished rosewood and varnished select burl walnut.

I) According to the Swedish collector and Larry Sheerin both revolvers were found in London either during the Second World War or just afterwards. This suggests to me that both revolvers are likely to have been in England or a country within the British Empire since the Great Exhibition of 1851. It is doubtful that a British dealer or collector in Colt firearms would have brought both guns to England from America prior to World War Two. They were probably sold to “modern day collectors” sometime after the end of World War Two

Page 15

J) None of the 1851 Exhibition guns were British proofed including #10222 and #10223. The five hundred guns that Colt displayed in the 1851 Exhibition were allowed into England by the British Government without being proofed providing they were not sold on the open market. After the Exhibition the guns were allowed by the British government to be presented to individuals, institutions or serving officers that were leaving Britain to serve in far-flung countries of the British Empire such as India, South Africa or Australia..

K) There is sufficient reasoning to believe that both revolvers were manufactured before 1st May, 1851 in time for the opening of the Exhibition.

L) The ‘Charles, Nephew & Co. Calcutta’ was inscribed on #10223 after the Great Exhibition ended. The inscription does not have any bearing on #10223’s ‘Exhibition’ status. Engraved panel-scened Colt Second Model Dragoon #10333 also has the inscription of ‘Charles, Nephew & Co. Calcutta’ inscribed on the back-strap. This inscription also does not have any bearing on #10333’s ‘Exhibition’ status. This revolver was found in India which supports my theory.

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I have had great pleasure in researching this magnificent and historical revolver which tells its story for he first time since its manufacture over one hundred and sixty three years ago. I am sure that much of my findings and suppositions will receive some criticism and I look forward to debating the subject matter in the future.

Pete Holder    May 2014

REFERENCES & ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS:

1) ‘Charles Nephew & Co, Calcutta’. The makers of Indian Colonial silver by Wynyard R.T. Wilkinson, FSA.Scot. A Register of European goldsmiths, silversmiths, jewellers, watchmakers and clockmakers in India and their marks 1760-1860. 1987 W.R.T. Wilkinson, 99D Talbot Road, London W11 2AT.

2) The Book of Colt Firearms by Sutherland & Wilson on page 90 states that ‘A few Second Model Dragoons were specially engraved by the factory’.

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3) The panel scene of Marquis De Lafayette was identified by Dean Nelson, the Museum Administrator of the Colt Museum Collection and also the chief librarian at the Connecticut State Library, Hartford, Connecticut in October 2003. Their findings were confirmed by Warren Anderson.

4) During a conversation with John (Jack) Malloy in Hartford, Connecticut in October 2003 he confirmed my feelings that in his opinion the engraving on Colt Second Model Dragoon #10223 and #10222 were both by the hand of Waterman Lily Ormsby.

5) Plate from W.L. Ormsby’s book on bank note engraving and on counterfeiting. Image number 24 is a full length image of Lafayette. See: The Colt Engraving Book’ Volume I by R.L. Wilson on page 211.

6) Scheffer, Ary (1793-1858), French: Lafayette 1822. Oil on canvas. Harvard honors Lafayette.

7) Marquis de Lafayette Collections at Lafayette College. Website:

8) There are numerous items showing both Lafayette and Washington together including bank notes such as the five dollar note issued by the Canal Bank of New Orleans, ten dollar note issued by the Commercial Bank of Columbia (1847) and the twenty dollar note issued by the Chesapeake & Ohio Canal Company (1840).

9) Bryson Strauss, Assistant Curater of the Autry Museum of Western Heritage kindly gave me the following information that was on the museums database: Colt Third Model Dragoon #10222. Ca. 1851. “Donut” style scrollwork. Engraved bust of George Washington on left side. Serpent design on each side of hammer. No dot marking with serial number. Burl walnut grips. Heavily engraved overall. Scene of white men shooting indians on horseback, on cylinder. Formerly in the collection of Larry Sheerin and on loan display at Whitney Gallery of Western Art, Cody, Wyoming.

10) In Larry Sheerin’s  ‘Collection of early Colt revolvers’ lent by him to the Whitney Gallery of Western Art in the 1960’s he lists: 10. Third Model Colt Dragoon- Engraved with Washington Bust $10,000. This compares with: 3. Colt Walker U.S. Army-1847. Only known complete cased specimen $20,000. This gives an idea of prices of antique Colt revolvers in years gone by. 

11) Samuel Colt Presents Wadsworth Atheneum, Hartford. Page 236. Copyright 1961 by Wadsworth Atheneum, Hartford. Samuel Colt wrote to his brother Elisha whilst in Vienna on July 18th, 1849 requesting the manufacture of about fifty Colt revolvers to be embellished with ‘Exhibition Grade’ scroll engraving.  Fifteen were ‘ large size pistols’ (Dragoons) and thirty five were ‘small size pistols’ (Baby Dragoon). These guns were  to be used to advertise and promote Colt Firearms at domestic fairs and exhibitions world-wide. In the letter Colt wrote  ‘… I want to have specimens of our arms prepared….& exhibated in their boxes at the anual fairs of the American Institute &  the Mecanicks institutes of N.York, also the fairs to be hild this fall in Boston & Philedelphia & any other places where they award gold medols in premeum for the best inventions.Theis medles we must get & I must have them with me in Europe to help make up the reputation of my arms as soon as I begin to make a noyes about them…….’. 

12) Colt’s stand at the Great Exhibition of 1851  from a lithograph produced by the Illustrated London News.

13) I would like to express my thanks to Philip Boulton of Southampton, England. He has done extensive research on the serial numbers of all Colt percussion firearms. His database, lists 18% of the production of Colt Second Model Dragoons as of July 2014. Phil has also very kindly proof-read this article. Thanks also to Dave Watson who first produced this article as a booklet.

Copyright Pete Holder July 2014.

 

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Colt Second Model Dragoon serial number 10223
Colt Third Model Dragoon serial number 10222

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